Land, literacy and the state in Sudanic Africa
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Land, literacy and the state in Sudanic Africa

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Published by The Red Sea Press in Trenton, NJ .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementedited by Donald Crummey.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDT
The Physical Object
Paginationvi, 274 p. :
Number of Pages274
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22625146M
ISBN 10156902183X

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  Land, Literacy and the State in Sudanic Africa re-conceptualizes Sudanic Africa—“the land of the Blacks” to classical Arab geographers—to include the Ethiopian Highlands in the East. It notes the prevalence of states across this belt of the continent and argues that to fully understand them, we must understand the relations between 5/5(1).   Land, Literacy and the State in Sudanic Africa re-conceptualizes Sudanic Africa "the land of the Blacks" to classical Arab geographers to include the Ethiopian Highlands in the East. It notes the prevalence of states across this belt of the continent and argues that to fully understand them, we must understand the relations between their rulers Format: Paperback. Download The Early State In African Perspective books, The essays in this volume are the product of an interdisciplinary research seminar on The Early State in Africa, conducted during the academic year at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. This seminar was one of a series of seminars on comparative civilizations. The Muslim Ummah of Southwest Nigeria (MUSWEN), has identified literacy and skill acquisition as veritable instruments in liberating the poor and the less-privileged from poverty, urging Muslim.

  Map \(\PageIndex{1}\) shows the large area in West Africa commonly referred to as the Western Sudan. The Western Sudan does not correspond with a modern-day African country; instead, it is a region. Arabic-speaking travelers gave the region its name, calling it bilad-al-Sudan or the “Land of Blacks.” The Western Sudan encompasses the Sahel.   Vol. 3, Africa from the Seventh to the Eleventh Century. London: James Currey, E-mail Citation» Several chapters are still useful, especially 11 (on the role of the Sahara in North-South relations, pp. –), 13 (on the Almoravids, pp. –), and 14 (on trade routes in West Africa. Sudan, the vast tract of open savanna plains extending across Africa between the southern limits of the Sahara (desert) and the northern limits of the equatorial rain forests. The term derives from the Arabic ‘bilad al-sudan’ (‘land of the black peoples’) and has been in use from at least the 12th century.   Sudan, once the largest and one of the most geographically diverse states in Africa, split into two countries in July after the.

  The second volume of Arabic Literature of Africa (of which six volumes are planned) deals with the literature of Central Sudanic Africa, i.e. the area lying between the present Republic of the Sudan and Mali. The bulk of the work concerns Nigeria, which has produced a voluminous and varied Arabic-Islamic literature. The smaller and less studied Arabic literature traditions of Chad, Cameroun Format: Hardcover. How Islam spread into sub-Saharan region of West Africa, and the great civilizations it established there, taking its inhabitants out of paganism to the worship of One God. Part 3: A brief history of the Islamic Empires of Kanem-Bornu and Hausa-Fulani Land., How Islam spread into sub-Saharan region of West Africa, and the great civilizations it established there, taking its inhabitants out of.   Land use: This entry contains the percentage shares of total land area for three different types of land use: agricultural land, forest, and other; agricultural land is further divided into arable land - land cultivated for crops like wheat, maize, and rice that are replanted after each harvest, permanent crops - land cultivated for crops like. Sudan, country located in northeastern name Sudan derives from the Arabic expression bilād al-sūdān (“land of the blacks”), by which medieval Arab geographers referred to the settled African countries that began at the southern edge of the Sahara. For more than a century, Sudan—first as a colonial holding, then as an independent country—included its neighbour South Sudan.